frantzofanon:

fetishizing POC is not combatting racism

(via emmatheadventurous)

angelclark:

99-Year-Old Lady Sews A Dress A Day For Children In Need 

Lillian Weber, a 99-year-old good Samaritan from Iowa, has spent the last few years sewing a dress a day for the Little Dresses For Africa charity, a Christian organization that distributes dresses to children in need in Africa and elsewhere.

Weber’s goal is to make 1,000 dresses by the time she turns 100 on May 6th. So far, she’s made more than 840. Though she says she could make two a day, she only makes one – but each single dress she makes per day is personalized with careful stitchwork. She hopes that each little girl who receives her dress can take pride in her new garment.

(via morgueresident)

surprisebitch:

this is why you cant say that nicki is not a feminist

(Source: fistopherbrown, via toxic-cupcake)

clubpunk:

blackcubs:

vehxt:

“I also thank Angelina for dressing in hijab while she visited not just Iraqi refugees but refugees in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Not only did she look good in it, she showed respect and appreciation for their culture and religion and made sure that the focus was not on her looks but rather her mission.”

This photo carries so much emotion

I love her I have no words

clubpunk:

blackcubs:

vehxt:

“I also thank Angelina for dressing in hijab while she visited not just Iraqi refugees but refugees in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Not only did she look good in it, she showed respect and appreciation for their culture and religion and made sure that the focus was not on her looks but rather her mission.”

This photo carries so much emotion

I love her I have no words

(Source: inabluebox, via grootfarmer)

dontneedyourheroact:

what i love about mythbusters is that once they bust a myth they manipulate their variables until something finally explodes bc we all know why you’re really watching this show

(via tinystarlord)

rhamphotheca:

Japan’s cherry blossom stone is a natural wonder
Meet the cherry blossom stone from Japan - one of the most striking natural rock formations in the world.
by Bec Crew
So-called because when you crack them open, their internal cross-sections look like tiny golden-pink flowers, cherry blossom stones (sakura ishi in Japanese) get their beautiful patterns from mica, which is a commonly found silicate mineral known for its shiny, light-reflecting surface. 
These flower patterns weren’t always made of mica. They started their existence as a complex matrix of six prism-shaped crystal deposits of a magnesium-iron-aluminium composite called cordierite, radiating out from a single dumbbell-shaped crystal made from a magnesium-aluminium-silicate composite called indialite in the centre. 
Hosted inside a fine-grained type of rock called a hornfels - formed underground around 100 million years ago by the intense heat of molten lava - cherry blossom stones underwent a second significant metamorphosis in their geological lifespan when they were exposed to a type of hot water called hydrothermal fluids…
(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia/NZ)
images: John Rakovan et al.

rhamphotheca:

Japan’s cherry blossom stone is a natural wonder

Meet the cherry blossom stone from Japan - one of the most striking natural rock formations in the world.

by Bec Crew

So-called because when you crack them open, their internal cross-sections look like tiny golden-pink flowers, cherry blossom stones (sakura ishi in Japanese) get their beautiful patterns from mica, which is a commonly found silicate mineral known for its shiny, light-reflecting surface. 

These flower patterns weren’t always made of mica. They started their existence as a complex matrix of six prism-shaped crystal deposits of a magnesium-iron-aluminium composite called cordierite, radiating out from a single dumbbell-shaped crystal made from a magnesium-aluminium-silicate composite called indialite in the centre. 

Hosted inside a fine-grained type of rock called a hornfels - formed underground around 100 million years ago by the intense heat of molten lava - cherry blossom stones underwent a second significant metamorphosis in their geological lifespan when they were exposed to a type of hot water called hydrothermal fluids

(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia/NZ)

images: John Rakovan et al.

(via silverenvy09)

linguisticsyall:

when a native is helping you pronounce a word and you repeat after them and they respond with “yeah it’s hard” that’s how you know you fucked it up lol

(via rikinowgay)

prokopetz:

kurtwagnernightcrawler:

civil-anarchy:

lordgrunty:

whitebeltwriter:

artemis-devotee:

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

""but that book character has blue/grey/light eyes so obviously they’re white!!"" ://///

Yes, goddamnit(Reminder that light eyes and blonde hair can be caused by conditions, such as Waardenburg Syndrome and albinism, but they are still real people that can (and should) be represented in media and such)And also I can add that I have news for y’all, people can be black and naturally blondeAnd literally people from ANY KIND can be a redheadand have freackles and suchSo please, stop pretending only white people can have those characteristics, jfc, it’s sofucking annoying.

boom-de-yada

Boom de yada

Just to add on - While race is a very, very, very significant issue, race as we know it is a social construct. When you acknowledge that all people on earth have veeeery little genetic variation in the scope of things, it’s much easier to break oneself from the training of “only white people have this, only black people have that, only asian people have this trait, etc”

the funny thing ist though, even if a character is described as having dark skin, dark hair and brown eyes, theyre still being cast as white

It’s also worth noting that the fact that a black person has blonde or red hair doesn’t necessarily mean they’ve got a white ancestor kicking around in their family tree. Recent genetic studies suggest that the gene that codes for blonde hair in black African populations is completely different from the gene that codes for blonde hair in white European populations, and that blond hair among Aboriginal Australian populations is connected to yet a third gene. The same trait has independently arisen at least three times in humanity’s generic history, and only one of those cases is linked with light skin per se.
(Interestingly, this also means that the widspread belief that blonde hair is part of a complex of adaptations to low-sunlight regions is probably false, since populations that live in the sunniest parts of the world have their own blonde-hair mutations unrelated to the European one.)

prokopetz:

kurtwagnernightcrawler:

civil-anarchy:

lordgrunty:

whitebeltwriter:

artemis-devotee:

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

""but that book character has blue/grey/light eyes so obviously they’re white!!"" ://///

Yes, goddamnit

















(Reminder that light eyes and blonde hair can be caused by conditions, such as Waardenburg Syndrome and albinism, but they are still real people that can (and should) be represented in media and such)

And also I can add that I have news for y’all, people can be black and naturally blonde







And literally people from ANY KIND can be a redheadand have freackles and such


















So please, stop pretending only white people can have those characteristics, jfc, it’s sofucking annoying.

boom-de-yada

Boom de yada

Just to add on - While race is a very, very, very significant issue, race as we know it is a social construct. When you acknowledge that all people on earth have veeeery little genetic variation in the scope of things, it’s much easier to break oneself from the training of “only white people have this, only black people have that, only asian people have this trait, etc”

the funny thing ist though, even if a character is described as having dark skin, dark hair and brown eyes, theyre still being cast as white

It’s also worth noting that the fact that a black person has blonde or red hair doesn’t necessarily mean they’ve got a white ancestor kicking around in their family tree. Recent genetic studies suggest that the gene that codes for blonde hair in black African populations is completely different from the gene that codes for blonde hair in white European populations, and that blond hair among Aboriginal Australian populations is connected to yet a third gene. The same trait has independently arisen at least three times in humanity’s generic history, and only one of those cases is linked with light skin per se.

(Interestingly, this also means that the widspread belief that blonde hair is part of a complex of adaptations to low-sunlight regions is probably false, since populations that live in the sunniest parts of the world have their own blonde-hair mutations unrelated to the European one.)

(Source: nya-kin, via mountlandme)

interesting stuff

kittenkiss:

This makes me so happy

(Source: 89cats, via penworthy)

adhoption:

river-b:

motherfuckinoedipus:

abnels:

memeguy-com:

You win this round cheese

actually that is a rectangle cheese

[oxford comma laughing in the distance]

[vocative comma wondering what oxford comma thinks it’s doing here]

I already reblogged this for the pun but I’m reblogging again for the sick punctuation banter

adhoption:

river-b:

motherfuckinoedipus:

abnels:

memeguy-com:

You win this round cheese

actually that is a rectangle cheese

[oxford comma laughing in the distance]

[vocative comma wondering what oxford comma thinks it’s doing here]

I already reblogged this for the pun but I’m reblogging again for the sick punctuation banter

(via ringmasters)